Tag Archives: Fricke

Trove Tuesday – Looking for Weeroona

“Weroona”  is a house in Camp Crescent, Castlemaine.  My parents lived there for a short while after their marriage in 1929 and I have also  found it mentioned  in newspapers.

There are not many houses in Camp Crescent but in the past there have been many newspaper references to people who lived there.  Mrs Reid who  lived there in 1898 was one of these, though not necessarily in Weroona, but there is no voter of the name Reid five years later in the Electoral Roll.

Servant Camp Crescent 1896

Then in 1913 Weroona is mentioned by the versatile teacher Robert George.

Weroona 1913 Singing lessons Robt George

Unfortunately  Mr. Robt. George does not appear in the Electoral Roll for Castlemaine.John Vale Weroona 1928

 

In the Electoral Rolls Elizabeth is consistently listed as a Stationer of Mostyn St.   Why was she at Weroona when she died.   At that stage could it have been some kind of small Nursing Home

Some facts –

  1.  The house “Weroona” existed as evidenced in newspaper reports.
  2.  A 1929 family album  photo of my mother and her sister-in-law sitting on a verandah with distinctive railings.
  3.  A photo on the same day of my father, Charles Fricke,  with his sister Enid,  presumably  at the same house with similar railings.
  4. A more recent view of the rear of the Old Castlemaine Court House with similar railings.  This building is in Goldsmith Crescent which is the continuation of Camp Crescent.

So – comments and questions –

  1.  In 1929 my parents living at Weroona in Camp Crescent, which bears a uncanny resemblance to the Old Court House in nearby Goldsmith Crescent
  2. Were the first two photos taken at Weroona or the Old Court House ?
  3. In the second picture there appear to be six or seven steps to get to verandah level whereas in the Court House photo there appear to be four or five steps.
  4. In the second photo there is a shield shaped cover at the centre of each of the criss-crosses which are not on the Court House photo.  Surely in restoration work of the Old Court House they would replicate the old style.
  5.  In the centre photo there are single “criss-crosses” between verandah posts whereas in the Court House photo there appear to be two “criss-crosses” between verandah posts.
  6. Weroona is the house where the newly married couple were tin kettled a few days after returning from their honeymoon. ( For an explanation of tin kettling see tin kettlins. )

I am now fairly sure they are two different houses – Weroona and the Court House -and it wasn’t a case of going for an afternoon stroll to visit the Old Court House and take photos.

Somewhere out there if I had the access are the answesr to these questions.  But thanks to Trove I now know tha “Weroona” definitely existed.

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Dear Little Bertie

Titanic Survivors

Most people know the story of the Titanic and the Iceberg.  This week Sepia Saturday gave us  a photo pf two young orphans who survived the disaster.

They are

Louis and Lola.

My family had a different kind of sad story with

Alan and Albert

 

 

These are my father’s two younger brothers, Alan and Albert Edward Fricke of Apollo Bay, being photographed in 1920.

Bertie&Alan

At the time this photo was taken my father, their older brother, was 16 years old and was only home on the farm at weekends, the weekdays spent boarding in Colac while he attended High School.

Alan was just six and a half months old which would place this photo as early August in 1920.  Bertie of the golden locks was 2 years and 5 months old.

Two months later, on October 11th, 1920, Bertie  died of diphtheria

They talk about people wearing their best bib and tucker.  It looks as though Alan is actually wearing his best “bib” for the photo..

On the back of the photo is written “dear little Bertie”

The photographer was Mendelssohn so the photo was possibly taken on a trip to Melbourne.

For other interpretations of the Titanic orphans go to Sepia Saturday.

The Bridges to Paradise

This week Sepia Saturday suggested bridges as our theme and my header above shows the bridge over the Barham River just as it flows into the ocean on the outskirts of the township of Apollo Bay in south-western Victoria.   The Barham River rises in the Otway Ranges 16 km , i.e. less than 10 miles away from Apollo Bay.  After coming down through narrow valleys it  begins to widen as it passes through farmland then  meanders through a flood plain before flowing into the sea.

But this final crossing of the river is not one that we would normally use, instead we would head west from the town along the Barham River Road, skirt the flood plain and follow the road between farms. A short distance out of town you come to the first river crossing.

Barham River First crossing 4

Norma-Barbara c1936 Apollo Bay

This picture was  taken at one of the Barham River bridges  about 1936.  On the right is my father’s youngest sister Norma Fricke.  Born in 1926 she died earlier this year

The road continues between farming land until it passes between what used to be the Fricke and Garrett farms and comes to a second bridge.

Barham River Secomd crossing b

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Seated on bridge rail – Alan Fricke, Tom Hodgins (son in law), The father Charles Fricke Snr. Standing – Charles Fricke Jr, A friend, Hazel Fricke, the mother Julia Fricke And at the front, the youngest in the family, Norma Fricke

This photo on one of the local bridges was taken in the early 1930s.  Counting the photographer, who was possibly Tom’s wife Enid,  there are nine people so they wouldn’t have all fitted in the family car, an Essex of about the 1930 vintage.

Entertainment was strictly of the home-made kind and a daytime walk was sometimes taken across this second Barham River bridge, following the road further upstream into the valley.  In this Google Earth photo you can see the right hand road following the stream.  Though the hills are cleared  a narrow strip  of bush remains along the river bank.

Barham River valley aerial

barham river ferns

 

After crossing this second bridge a little further up the  road is an area along the river called Paradise, and  on a hot day in summer this gully really is Paradise  – a cool  paradise of lush tree ferns and other local trees and plants , lichens and mosses, and home to a variety of birds.  It is a magical place.  With its special aroma and the music of the water over the pebbles every leaf has the potential to have a fairy peeping out from underneath.

Paradise 1When you leave the road and walk along the river you can cross over on fallen trees or on stepping stones in shallow parts of the narrow river. . The bottom  is  pebbled and the water is fresh and clear.

Paradise 4

More bridges from around the world can be found through

this week’s Sepia Saturday contributions.

Blouses with Ties; Black Stockings and Short Pants

This week I have a fairly good match to Sepia Saturday’s  theme photo with a photo of  the prefects at Colac High School in 1920

Colac is 150 km to the south west of Melbourne in Victoria.  There were 61 students when the  school opened in 1911 and it  was known as the Colac Agricultural High School.  As Colac was the centre of a farming area for some years the Pastoral and Agricultural Society had been agitating for such a school.

Colac High School 1920Seated at the left end in this 1920 photo is Charles Fricke, who at fifteen  was still to graduate into long pants. He didn’t live in Colac but came up each term from the coastal town of Apollo Bay and boarded privately. He would ride a horse up at the start of term then the horse would go into agistment until the end of term.   Smaller country towns couldn’t justify the need for a secondary school so the primary schools went to  Eighth Grade, after which students at fourteen were able to leave school and go home to work on the farm or take other employment.  Those who wanted more education went to a larger  town with a secondary school , or to a much larger town which had boarding schools.

Two years after Charles was photographed his younger sister Enid (on the right) was also attending the school.  Both went on to be teachers. They were then followed by another brother and two sisters.

But the original school was closed and since 2008 they do their learning in a  flat-roofed, uninteresting building, a derelict of the future.  1’m sure though that inside this bleak exterior some wonderful education is going on. I just can’t help loving older style  buildings.

The old school became  derelict. The creeper went from the pillars, the weeds grew, the building was vandalized.

colac high School 2014Let’s hope they can find some use for the old lady.

Colac High School 2015

More group photos can be found in the list on this week’s Sepia Saturday.

A baby in Adelaide in 1869

My contribution to Sepia Saturday this week, with its request for mother and baby photos is this carte de visite presenting  John Henry Baynham Bosley  born in Adelaide 6th June 1869 and sitting on the knee of his mother Corah.

ManWoman3chnAdelaideThis photographer changed the information on the back of his cards from time to time and this allows us to date this photo to  1869 – 1870.

BackOfManWoman3chnAlso in the photo is Thomas George Dufty Bosley. born October 1867,  sitting on his father’s knee, with Eliza Bosley born 1864 standing between her parents. There had been another daughter Annie but she had died. These children are my grandfather’s cousins.

The father in the photo is Thomas Bosley who came from Coleford in Gloucestershire and he was the older brother of my great grandmother Eliza Fricke We have seen her before in Tea Time with Bikes , at home in Newland St Coleford and as the mother of the bride in  the Bride was Eliza.

But we have also met  the toddler Thomas George on the right of the photo when he was older  in Men in Aprons – Potters   When this Tom Jr. was nine years old he began work at Hindmarsh Pottery  as an apprentice  to his Uncle George, now his stepfather.   His job was to weigh up the clay and prepare the balls for “throwing”.

Thomas and Corah had six children before Thomas died in 1873, three months before his sixth child was born.  Corah who was still in her twenties  then married Thomas’s younger brother George and had six more children.

This photo was in the possession of Eliza Fricke (nee Bosley), when she died.  She lived in Carisbrook, Victoria and her two brothers in Adelaide, South Australia.  Eliza Fricke’s two Bosley brothers are the only Adelaide connection discovered in the family ,  No one has said that this is a photo of Thomas and Corah Bosley and their children but my identification is based upon the  fact of Eliza Fricke’s two brothers living in Adelaide , the dating of the photo from recorded identifications used on the back of the carte de visite, and the order and ages of the children.

Another carte de visite from Adelaide dated at 1874 – 5 is this photo which I believe is the younger brother George, the second husband to Corah. He was a prominent potter in Adelaide at that time.

T.Duryea   Artist   Photographer No 57872 Carte de visite believed to 1874-5

I am quite confident with my deductions;  Until someone proves me wrong.

More Mums and Bubs and other bits and pieces are to found on this week’s Sepia Saturday.

 

Tea Time – with Bikes

The Place – Park Farm near Carisbrook in Central Victoria, home of the Fricke family

The occasion – Afternoon Tea

The Time – Probably between 1900 and 1913
10734101_10204957792404978_8305473657801097147_n

And the people – there is only one that I can be fairly sure about and that is Eliza Fricke (nee Bosley) (1843-1913) and she is the left hand lady, in black, of the group of three seated in the centre of the photo.

Eliza is the hostess and has brought a nice small table and chairs on to the verandah.  Another lady in a dark dress is seated to the right, She could be a friend but more likely to be  a relation from the  Fricke, Aston, Peet, Williams, Attwood, Thomas families who lived in the district. . A younger third guest sits between these two ladies, identified as the third cyclist by her ‘”uniform” of dark skirt and light-coloured blouse.  The other two cyclists are holding their bikes.

The remaining  younger person,  dressed in white and standing behind the chair is possibly not a visitor.  Of Eliza’s  daughters, Eliza married in 1901 and Tilly married in 1903.  So possibly this last person could be Tilly if the picture was taken before 1903 and assuming Tilly was still living at home

But then there is the boy standing at the back. If he is Eliza’s grandson then he would have been born in 1891 (I think this is too early), 1896 or 1904.  In which case if the lady in white is his mother then he was born 1896 and is visiting from Melbourne.  Or if born in 1904 then his mother lives 22 km away in Newstead and the time of the photo would be closer to 1913.  Just how old is that boy ?

My guess is that he was born 1904.  If he was born 1896 then there should also be two little girls in the photo.

This photo shows that more blinds have been added to the house since a previous photo

This week’s  post is following the theme of bikes as suggested by Sepia Saturday, the place where you will find links to many similar posts.

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At Home in Newland St, Coleford

This week I begin with an  postcard which is showing its age at 111 years  and which has some identifying printing on the front, though no message has been written in the conveniently placed blank space.

postcard of newland stIt tells us that it is a photo of Newland St in Coleford, on the edge of the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire.

The printing at the end  also tells us that it is one of The Wrench Series of postcards and also has the name  Arthur J. Bright,  Coleford.  Arthur Bright was the Editor of The Dean Forest Guardian.

The Powerhouse Museum in Sydney tells us about the Wrench Series.

One of the first picture postcard companies which offered British views was set up by a 17 year old teenager Evelyn Wrench. His idea for the company, Messrs. Wrench and Co., began while on holiday in Germany with his parents in 1900.

On the left is the Baptist Church  and at the far end of the street you can get a glimpse of the clock tower standing in the Market Place at the crossroads at the centre of the town. Originally it was part of an octagonal church.  These can be seen on this section of an 1840 tithe map of Coleford

map newland stThe postcard was in the possession of my great aunt whose mother Eliza Bosley  had come to Australia from Coleford in 1863 and the image was provided to me by a second cousin.  The card had been posted in Coleford in 1904 to a Mrs Ambery  in Williamstown.  Friend or relation, I do not know at this stage, but with the help of some clues from Mark  Dodd I now have a reasonable explanation of  how it came to shift from Williamstown, a suburb of Melbourne, to Eliza Fricke in the mid-Victorian town  of Carisbrook.

postcard of newland st 1904 - bqackWhen Eliza was young and living in Coleford her maternal aunt Amelia Baynham and her husband Stephen Aston, living at Five Acres, just to the north of Coleford, had a lodger.   It was 1851 and the lodger was William Ambery, a year younger than their son Edward Aston.  Eliza would have known these two young men. After all Edward Aston was her cousin.  Both boys were to marry and together with their wives emigrated to Adelaide in 1855 on the John Banks.  Then both families either together or separately moved over to Carisbrook in Victoria. Edward Aston was to remain in Carisbrook but William and Mary moved on after a while. 

Meanwhile Eliza grew up, lost both her parents and with two younger sisters came out to Carisbrook  in 1863 to be reunited with  Edward and his wife Ann, and William and his wife Mary.  And so  it stands to reason that Mary, later on living  in Williamstown, would  pass on to Eliza a picture of “the street where you lived” which had been sent to Mary – Newland St, Coleford. There is still the question in my mind as to whether or not William Ambery could have been related to his hosts, Stephen and Amelia Aston.

Here is a  similar view of Newland St  taken by my sister in 1986 with someone sitting on the front fence of the Baptist Church, taken before I knew of the postcard’s existence.NewlandSt1986And why is this particular view of Newland St of interest to me ?  It is because of this next photo which is the house where  Eliza Bosley lived  in Coleford before coming to Australia and it was somewhere opposite the Baptist Church.   Presumably that is Eliza or one of her sisters in front of the house.

ColefordHouseTwo vertical groups of three windows, with the uppermost being slightly smaller.  Could this building  possibly be the same white  house, in the centre of the 1986 photo, with a single doorway replacing the original two doors.  It is opposite the Baptist Church,   Or is it just my imagination.

As for William and Mary Ambery, William had joined the Victorian Railways and was a train examiner at Castlemaine, then after an illness moved to Williamstown and opened a woodyard,  in Douglas Parade. He was also elected a Councillor on the Williamstown Council. (Trove)

And so my story comes full circle beginning with a postcard arriving for Mrs Ambery in Douglas Parade,  Williamstown.

Meanwhile, over at Sepia Saturday   people are posting about courtrooms and all things legal, or anything else which takes their fancy.

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