Monthly Archives: July 2015

The Mobile Butcher

Sepia Saturday Header

A butcher’s shop from Sepia Saturday to inspire us this week.  Or perhaps, pigs, or shops, or white aprons, or whatever rises to the surface on viewing this image.

So I will return to an image I have used before, that of Robert Butler, farmer and butcher of Moolort then Newstead  in Central Victoria, and his mobile butcher’s cart.    He married my great aunt Eliza Fricke in 1901

PICT0152But I had never stopped to consider what the inside of the cart might have looked like until recently I saw this image of a butcher’s cart which served a similar purpose.

This is a 1920s photo of butcher Bert Fahey, with  the cart belonging  to a Mr Rettke, possibly in the Camperdown, Murchison or Shepparton districts and was posted in Lost Country Victoria by Bert’s son.  The butcher is about to sharpen his knife on a sharpening steel and has some spring scales hanging from the roof of the cart ready to weight the meat.

I have a feeling that I might turn vegetarian if I had to buy my meat in this fashion.

But I am having trouble concentrating on all things related to butchers at the moment as it seems to be that time of year when Ant School from somewhere around my place is in Work Experience week.  In summer you come to expect the occasional trail of well-organized mature little fellows going Hup, two,  three, four, Hup, two, three, four making a beeline for the kitchen.  But in Work Experience Week it is just these little groups of untested baby ants being sent out on reconnaissance missions to see how they go.  They soon come to a very unfortunate end but no-one comes looking for them,  they have failed, they are expendable. And when they don’t return another little group ventures out along a slightly different route, only to meet with the same fate.  Poor little ants.

More butchers, pigs, shops etc, but probably no ants, will be found in this week’s Sepia Saturday post.

 

Blouses with Ties; Black Stockings and Short Pants

This week I have a fairly good match to Sepia Saturday’s  theme photo with a photo of  the prefects at Colac High School in 1920

Colac is 150 km to the south west of Melbourne in Victoria.  There were 61 students when the  school opened in 1911 and it  was known as the Colac Agricultural High School.  As Colac was the centre of a farming area for some years the Pastoral and Agricultural Society had been agitating for such a school.

Colac High School 1920Seated at the left end in this 1920 photo is Charles Fricke, who at fifteen  was still to graduate into long pants. He didn’t live in Colac but came up each term from the coastal town of Apollo Bay and boarded privately. He would ride a horse up at the start of term then the horse would go into agistment until the end of term.   Smaller country towns couldn’t justify the need for a secondary school so the primary schools went to  Eighth Grade, after which students at fourteen were able to leave school and go home to work on the farm or take other employment.  Those who wanted more education went to a larger  town with a secondary school , or to a much larger town which had boarding schools.

Two years after Charles was photographed his younger sister Enid (on the right) was also attending the school.  Both went on to be teachers. They were then followed by another brother and two sisters.

But the original school was closed and since 2008 they do their learning in a  flat-roofed, uninteresting building, a derelict of the future.  1’m sure though that inside this bleak exterior some wonderful education is going on. I just can’t help loving older style  buildings.

The old school became  derelict. The creeper went from the pillars, the weeds grew, the building was vandalized.

colac high School 2014Let’s hope they can find some use for the old lady.

Colac High School 2015

More group photos can be found in the list on this week’s Sepia Saturday.