A Pot Pourri of Parades

Different places, different times, different reasons. Parades occur in all forms and sizes, in towns large and small, in Australia.  My collection progresses in time through  a coastal village, a capital city  and a smaller regional city.

I have posted this photo before , from Apollo Bay on the south western coast of Victoria.  It is probably the Anzac Day procession in 1917.
ABProcessionStreet

Move in place and time to Adelaide, the capital city of South Australia.  Each year they have a Christmas Pageant.  These  photos from the late 1950s  were given to me by a friend as her husband played  in the band – the South Australian Railway Institute Band – when marching in the Parade.

South Australian Railway Institute Band 1

 

 

 

 

 

South Australian Railway Institute Band 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I like these photos because there was no need for barricades.

Then there is Bendigo  in Central Victoria  c 1967 and its marvellous annual Easter Parade

Here are my two little blondies  watching the parade and a pipe band passing by. Once again there are no barriers to keep the crowd back.  But the main attraction was always the splendid Chinese  dragon.

Bendigo Easter Parade c1966

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bendigo Easter Parade c1967 b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Bendigo came to be associated with a Chinese dragon is explained in this clip.

And to come right up to date, February 28th,  today Geelong had its annual Pako Fest parade , in Pakington St, celebrating culutral diversity.  Geelong Mayor’s Facebook page supplied this image.

Pako Fest

This is my collection of Parade photos.  Other examples of recollections of Parades past and present can be found at Sepia Saturday.

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Australian Television in 1962

Broadcasting is one of the possible themes for this week’s Sepia Saturday which set me thinking about the early days of television in Melbourne.  Television came to Melbourne in time for the 1956 Olympic Games.

This is a photo I took of our television set in 1962 when Victor Borge was very popular, developed and printed by yours truly.  It was taken on a Yashica twin lens reflex.  Do you remember Victor Borge, with his wonderful blend of piano playing and comedy.

Victor Borge Show TV sunshine 26-5-62 b

And this photo was taken the previous month of the same stand-alone black and white television,   when colour television and  remote controls were only dreamed of.18-5-1962For a nostalgic trip for Australian readers (well, some of them ) earlier in the same year saw the presentation of the 4th Annual TV Logie Awards.  I had to dig deep to remember some of these names.

Logies1962

And finally here is a short clip of the two delightful Gold-winning singers

See what other interesting ideas  people find in this image of broadcasting from the top of a bus at Sepia Saturday.

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And After Valentine’s Day …………

First comes Valentine’s Day, on February 14th, all sweetness and light …..

2015.01W-64 And then comes reality …..

Funny 1909This postcard, from Bamforth & Co, was posted in April 1909.

This at a time when women didn’t go out to work, women didn’t wear pants or jeans, and when a domineering woman who ruled her hen-pecked husband was said “to wear the trousers“.

Perhaps a modern version would have Who is going to have control of the remote control ?

More connections to Valentine’s Day can be seen through the links on Sepia Saturday.

Dockside with the Randwick District Town Band

This week Sepia Saturday  has given us an image of a harbour, with its docks busy with ships.  And so I go to a Sydney dockside, back in  the  1960s when the big liners were a way of travelling from country to country and not just for holiday cruises, ships like the Oronsay travelling  from Sydney to England in about 3 weeks.   It was also a time when brass bands would play dockside as the liner was leaving.  In this photo from the 1960s it is the Randwick District Town Band which had formed in 1961.  Hilda Tansey. now in her sixties, is near the lower right hand corner, long after she was Bandmaster of the Sydney Ladies Brass Band.  Each departure was a big occasion

Randwick Band 1960s

Today we  don’t see aeroplanes departing for overseas being farewelled in such style.

The following quote is taken out of its original context which dealt with more creative activities,   http://tinyurl.com/q2pp332

 `There’s something to be said for following those little voices in your head that say, “Do it.”

`Because if you don’t, that moment gets lost to history.

But I feel it applies equally well to my  posts in Sepia Saturday (and to yours too).   In time there is always a reader or two who has a definite connection to what i am writing. When I link photos, facts and occasionally speculations there is always the possibility that if I don’t some little thing will be lost to history for all time . I’m not referring to momentous events but to the changing way of life over the years..

This week I started converting a box of slides from the 1960s into .jpg format for the computer.  So when browsing today I was delighted to find that the Daily Mail online has an article on slides from the 1960s which have been recovered.

There you will find a delightful snapshot of Britain in the 1960s. Most of my slides seem a bit ordinary in comparison but some might be of interest in the future.  For example, does anyone at children’s birthday parties nowadays play games like these, as in 1961.

Which brings me  to what Sepia Saturday is all about, as they state on their blog.

Sepia Saturday provides bloggers with an opportunity to share their history through the medium of photographs. Historical photographs of any age or kind (they don’t have to be sepia) become the launchpad for explorations of family history, local history and social history in fact or fiction, poetry or prose, words or further images.

I like that expression launch pad.  It is exactly what  we do, begin with a photo and then launch ourselves off in varying directions   Fantastic.  Thank you Sepia Saturday.

More harbours, ports, docks, coastlines at this week’s Sepia Saturday.

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4d a week

Reading for Women in 1939

This week Sepia Saturday has invited us to start with an old advertisement.  And so I chose this one from a coverless copy of the  Australian magazine Woman  of  5th June, 1939 .  Who could have imagined instant hot water in the kitchen sink.  No more carrying kettles of boiling water over to the sink from the stove.  Marvellous.

sink HWS 1939The magazine has an advertisement on nearly every page with a strong emphasis on cures for colds, tinned food, bile beans, pick-me-up Worcestershire sauce, sewing machines – all things to tempt the housewife.

But I was in for a surprise.  Do you remember this famous opening line ?

Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again

This was from Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier  and here it is being serialized in a 1939 magazine.  In this issue they are up to Chapter 6, soon after Mrs van Hopper has been told of the engagement.

Rebecca serial 1939So, the book was published  in 1938, serialized in 1939 and made into a movie by Alfred Hitchcock in 1940 starring Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine.  Big Sigh.  Then remade in 1997 starring Charles Dance and  Emilia Fox.  Little Sigh.   I was interested to see it referred to as a gothic romance in the early days but then became a psychological drama once filmed.

And the reason for my mother having saved this particular magazine was that pages 2 and 3 were given over to And Listen to the Band, photos and text about women’s brass bands in Australia, including her sister Hilda Tansey and the Sydney Ladies Brass Band.

pp 2 3 Woman Listen to the Band 1939And the tempting little offer of Free Best Quality Aluminium  ware was available if you saved the labels of Inglis products such as their tea, coffee, porridge, etc, a forerunner of our present day Reward points.

Sepia Saturday gave us this advertisement for nice soft cushions to place on the horse’s hooves.  Other Sepians will have all other kind of interesting ads.

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At Home in Newland St, Coleford

This week I begin with an  postcard which is showing its age at 111 years  and which has some identifying printing on the front, though no message has been written in the conveniently placed blank space.

postcard of newland stIt tells us that it is a photo of Newland St in Coleford, on the edge of the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire.

The printing at the end  also tells us that it is one of The Wrench Series of postcards and also has the name  Arthur J. Bright,  Coleford.  Arthur Bright was the Editor of The Dean Forest Guardian.

The Powerhouse Museum in Sydney tells us about the Wrench Series.

One of the first picture postcard companies which offered British views was set up by a 17 year old teenager Evelyn Wrench. His idea for the company, Messrs. Wrench and Co., began while on holiday in Germany with his parents in 1900.

On the left is the Baptist Church  and at the far end of the street you can get a glimpse of the clock tower standing in the Market Place at the crossroads at the centre of the town. Originally it was part of an octagonal church.  These can be seen on this section of an 1840 tithe map of Coleford

map newland stThe postcard was in the possession of my great aunt whose mother Eliza Bosley  had come to Australia from Coleford in 1863 and the image was provided to me by a second cousin.  The card had been posted in Coleford in 1904 to a Mrs Ambery  in Williamstown.  Friend or relation, I do not know at this stage, but with the help of some clues from Mark  Dodd I now have a reasonable explanation of  how it came to shift from Williamstown, a suburb of Melbourne, to Eliza Fricke in the mid-Victorian town  of Carisbrook.

postcard of newland st 1904 - bqackWhen Eliza was young and living in Coleford her maternal aunt Amelia Baynham and her husband Stephen Aston, living at Five Acres, just to the north of Coleford, had a lodger.   It was 1851 and the lodger was William Ambery, a year younger than their son Edward Aston.  Eliza would have known these two young men. After all Edward Aston was her cousin.  Both boys were to marry and together with their wives emigrated to Adelaide in 1855 on the John Banks.  Then both families either together or separately moved over to Carisbrook in Victoria. Edward Aston was to remain in Carisbrook but William and Mary moved on after a while. 

Meanwhile Eliza grew up, lost both her parents and with two younger sisters came out to Carisbrook  in 1863 to be reunited with  Edward and his wife Ann, and William and his wife Mary.  And so  it stands to reason that Mary, later on living  in Williamstown, would  pass on to Eliza a picture of “the street where you lived” which had been sent to Mary – Newland St, Coleford. There is still the question in my mind as to whether or not William Ambery could have been related to his hosts, Stephen and Amelia Aston.

Here is a  similar view of Newland St  taken by my sister in 1986 with someone sitting on the front fence of the Baptist Church, taken before I knew of the postcard’s existence.NewlandSt1986And why is this particular view of Newland St of interest to me ?  It is because of this next photo which is the house where  Eliza Bosley lived  in Coleford before coming to Australia and it was somewhere opposite the Baptist Church.   Presumably that is Eliza or one of her sisters in front of the house.

ColefordHouseTwo vertical groups of three windows, with the uppermost being slightly smaller.  Could this building  possibly be the same white  house, in the centre of the 1986 photo, with a single doorway replacing the original two doors.  It is opposite the Baptist Church,   Or is it just my imagination.

As for William and Mary Ambery, William had joined the Victorian Railways and was a train examiner at Castlemaine, then after an illness moved to Williamstown and opened a woodyard,  in Douglas Parade. He was also elected a Councillor on the Williamstown Council. (Trove)

And so my story comes full circle beginning with a postcard arriving for Mrs Ambery in Douglas Parade,  Williamstown.

Meanwhile, over at Sepia Saturday   people are posting about courtrooms and all things legal, or anything else which takes their fancy.

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A Bush Haircut

Australians were very fond of protecting their outside doors with a verandah, which had many other uses.  Here we have a verandah on a farmhouse in north central Victoria, c1949.  It is being used by some students for a money saving haircut during  their weekend visit.

Bush HaircutA future Member of Parliament is cutting the hair of a future Maths teacher, helped by one of the girlfriends while another girlfriend sits on the cool linoleum of the floor behind the wire screen door.  A good short back and sides with plenty of long stuff left on top.

In the background is one of the brothers nursing his rifle – there had probably been rabbit shooting that morning.  And the tripod is out.  It is flat, irrigation country so possibly some levels were to be taken that day.  You can also get a glimpse of the metal plates on top of the stumps, used to protect the house from termites.

A very important verandah.

Further links to this week’s theme photo can be found at Sepia Saturday

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