A Hotel in Castlemaine

I wouldn’t like to count the number of times I have walked around this corner  But that was many years after this photo was taken in 1906 at the corner of Barker and Templeton Streets in my home town of Castlemaine  in Central victoria.

Sepia Saturday tempted us this week with a photo of an imposing but austere hotel. I am much fonder of Australian buildings with their verandahs to protect us from the sun or to provide a place to sit and catch the evening breeze in the hot weather.

Castlemaine Council Club Hotel bThis well worn postcard  has 1906 handwritten on the back, but no message.  The hotel was originally built in 1875 as a single storey building  but in 1906 was converted to a fine two storey building. The next image shows the re-opening in 1906.

Castlemaine council club p-aitken-openingThis image came from  The Hub at 233 Barker St Castlemaine which is the present name of the building. They have a fine collection of photos of the Hotel over the years. De-licenced in 1970 in its present life The Hub is home to fifteen offices and one restaurant.

This is how Google Earth saw it in 2010 when it was undergoing its most recent renovation.

Castlemaine Council Club corner 2010 google earthBut my imagination takes me down the hill in the 1940s past, among others in the first block , the lawyers where for a while I thought that might be a good thing to do on leaving school, the bike shop where once stood a bike which was  labelled with my name as it waited for my birthday, the hairdresser – first perm, the shop where I spent my first ever earnings on a Toby jug for my mother,  the shop where I bought a hat with money i had earned myself,  the cafe where I washed dishes one school holidays, the newspaper shop where the morning paper cost tuppence,  the excellent photographer and the dreaded dentist.

As I said, I knew that corner well though I was never to go into the hotel.

More interesting hotels and big buildings can be seen through the links in

This Week’s Sepia Saturday

The Best of Intentions

I really try to respond to Sepia Saturday’s suggestions for  posts each week.  I really do.  But sometimes it just doesn’t work out.

Chess bTake three weeks ago for example. Chess.   The day this suggestion was posted I walked into our local librrary to pick up a book I’d ordered and right in front of me was a chess board, albeit a rather limp one. Out came the phone and snap, snap, there was a photo which perhaps I could include in a post.

I planned how I could include how my husband made a marble topped chess table – all the meticulous cutting of grey/black and white marble into small blocks and reassembling them, followed by the slow polishing to make a smooth surface and lowering into the lovely dark polished table.  A few shots of the chess set and the books and hey presto a post.  But it never happened.

The next week – a tunnel.  Well, this was the nearest I could come to a tunnel.

Cave at Queenscliff 1950 Norma Barbara DoreenIn 1950 Bendigo Teachers’ College sent its students to Queenslcliff for a one week Physical Education camp.  Plenty of spare time to explore the surrounds.  Does this look like a Tunnel.  Perhaps not.  More like a cave, or is it just an indentation in the cliff.  Is that Poldark’s Aidan Turner I see lurking in the shadows, storing contraband in the cave?  My mistake, this is not Cornwall, it is Australia.  Actually my friends say he is eye candy.  I fail to see it myself.  Oh dear.  Nothing got done.

desk 1963And this week the suggestion is a typewriter.  When I think of the procession of typewriters, word processors  and computers whose keyboards I have pounded you would think there would be a photo somewhere but no such luck.  But a typewriter usually sits on a desk and this 1963  photo shows a small portion of one of the desks we have had.  And no, she never took up smoking.

And coming up for the next three weeks we have hotels, fish and students.

As usual I have the best of intentions.

For others who have no trouble with their intentions consult Sepia Saturday 2015.05W-104

 

 

Kitchen Week – in Snitterfield

When Tom Tansey left Snitterfield near Stratford on Avon in 1888 to travel half way round the world to Geelong in Australia he knew that there was little chance that he would see his family again.  I find that hard to imagine, sixteen years old and never to see your parents, three sisters and brother. again.  Another sister was born the year after he left  but he was to meet her later on as she  also came to Australia.

Letitia Trickett, Geelong, aunt of Tom Tansey

Letitia Trickett, Geelong, aunt of Tom Tansey

 

One consolation was that he came to live with his Aunt Letitia  – his mother’s sister. She had married Phillip Trickett and settled in Geelong.  But she was a stranger to Tom as she had come to Australia in 1870, two years before Tom was born.

One thing Tom did have though was a photo of the kitchen that he left behind, the kitchen where he had grown up for sixteen years.

kitchen in SnitterfieldThe heart of the kitchen was a Victorian cast iron range- a utility version of the many kinds which were available.  There is a central firebox with a small oven either side and a chain hanging down to suspend a pot or kettle.  Either side of the range was a small warm nook, just the right size for a child.  There are interesting things to speculate on in the image – the lamp,  knickknacks on the mantlepiece, Father’s chair by the fire, bellows to blow the fire, a stool for a child  and what appears to be a curtain

There was a second brick oven outside in the  wash house.  It was there that the Sunday roast and Yorkshire pudding was cooked. The neighbours would bring their dinners to be baked and were charged a penny to help to help pay for the wood – they would also bake pies and tarts for the week.

This kitchen was the place for the weekly Saturday night bath in a tub in front of the fire.

It is where Tom’s mother sat to make rag rugs for the floor.

It is where Tom’s father would sit by the fire to read his Birmingham Weekly Post with a stumpy old clay pipe in his mouth (his nose warmer) and the cat Moses 0n his knee.

It is where Tom’s mother would set out for Gospel Oak to buy their honey and when there having to accept a cup of “tay” which had been strained through the seller’s hessian apron.

It was from this kitchen that Tom would set forth to band practice.

And from here he would also leave to go to school where he learnt his beautiful copperplate handwriting.

The details of life in the kitchen came from Ellen (Nin) Tansey (1889-1975), Tom’s sister who came to Australia as a war widow in 1920, to remarry and settle in Sydney.

More kitchen related stories can be found through this week’s Sepia Saturday bloggers.

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One two three, One two three

The image for Sepia Saturday this week  with its long dresses could be interpreted as dance time, dance time when dancing was dancing and not jiggity jig, hoppity hop.

And so learning to dance properly was de rigueur.   Circa 1960 at Sunshine High School in the Melbourne suburbs students devoted one period a week  to a club of their choice.  These photos are from the Dancing Club.  Ballroom dancing, of course.

Sunshine High Danicing Club 2Sunshine High Danicing Club 1Sunshine High Danicing Club 3First Dance Dress

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And a girl eventually got her first long dance dress, this time Christmas holidays at Apollo Bay in 1946/7 –  layers of blue and pink tulle with a corsage on the shoulder of blue and pink plastic flowers.

 

 

 

 

And more interpretations of Sepia Saturday’s image can be found listed on Sepia Saturday.

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Glaud Pender and the Naming of the Engines

In the 1860s the deep-lead mining industry flourished in Central Victoria.  The countryside was scattered with the poppet heads and the engine sheds of these mines.  And an engine shed contains an engine, one of the possible themes for this week’s Sepia Saturday.  Not having a suitable family photo for this theme I have had to look elsewhere to illustrate the connection with my famliy.

This is the Try Again mine in the gorge known as the Devils’s Kitchen as it was in the 1860s.
Try Again Mine in the devils kitchen 1860s

Image thanks to Joan Hunt  and the Public Records Office of Victoria who used it with permission from the Woady Yaloak Histtorical Society

With the mine workers coming into the area  communities grew up nearby with hotels and shops, school and  church. police station and Court House.  Such a town was Piggoreet, just near the Devil’s Kitchen, shown here as it was in 1860.

Piggoreet township in 1860

Piggoreet township in 1860 thanks to Joan Hunt and the Pubic Record Office of Victoria   who used it with permissin from the Woady Yaloak Historical Society.

This maps shows  the area I am talking about in relation to Melbourne , Geelong and Ballarat.

I have circled the major towns using a map from Joan Hunt and the Public Record Office of Victoria at http://prov.vic.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/HuntJE-F01.png

I am interested in the shaded area to the north-west, known as Springdallah.  In that area you can see Piggoreet and this is  the area in which Glaud Pender worked. I have written about Glaud (1827-1908), my great great great grandfather here and here  and here He had been  an engine worker near Fauldhouse in Scotland , midway between Glascow and Edinburgh and lying near the edge of a large coalfield, before he came to Australia    Perhaps he was familiar with going down the mine but he was an above-ground worker – the engines for pumping water from the mine and for lowering and raising the cages for transporting the miners and the ore.  So from coal mines in Scotland he progressed to being a goldmine manager in Australia.

We can partly track his progress through the birth of his children – Geelong, Egerton, Buninyong, Golden Lake and later at  Piggoreet., moving slowly through the goldfields to  the north-west of Melbourne.   By the 1860s he was mine manager at the Golden Lake mine and the birth of three of his children are also registered at Golden Lake to the west of Piggoreet.  But they were living close enough to Piggoreet for three of his children to be attending the Piggoreet Common School in the 1860s.

The miners had the interesting habit of a ceremonial naming of  their mine engines before they set them to work for the first time. With the gold mines so close together  there was a very cosy group of mine managers, mine workers and local dignitaries who would attend each other’s Mine Engine Namings.

At the Golden Lake mine in July 1864 the two engines were The Britannia and The lady of the Lake.  Glaud’s  daughter, Mrs Peter Telford, officially named The Lady of the Lake and Glaud’s brother-in-law  George Telford responded to the Health of the Contractors toast, As part of  the entertainments for the large crowd Glaud Pender  sang  The Rose of Allandale. What a versatile man  !

Glaud was also mentioned in the newspaper reports when he attended the  naming of the engines of the Golden Horn  at Piggoreet in July 1865     The Warrior and the smaller Reliance, each had a bottle of champagne smashed on its flywheel by a pretty young girl.  It was a fancy do with lots of toasts, food and liquor for the approximately 160 guests. One of the many toasts was to the neighbouring companies and Glaud responded to that toast.  Also present was his son in law Peter Telford.  At this time Glaud had three children at the Piggoreet Common School.

Then in August it was the turn of  the Emperor and Empress who were duly christened by another two ladies in a ceremony at Pitfield Plains and Glaud proposed the toast to the Success of the Golden Empire Company..  A similarly large event but the weather was bad and there was a mix-up with some of the invitations so that they didn’t arrive in time for the function.

For those with an engineering turn of mind The Ballarat Star  gives us details of the type of engines they were using at the Golden Lake Mine.

The machinery consists of a pumping and puddling engine, 20 1/4  in. cylinder, by T. M.Tennant and Co., of Leith, with a stroke of 4ft.;    and a smaller one for winding purposes, of 14 1/2 inch cylinder, 3 feet stroke, by Lockhart, of Kirkaldy. These are new, well finished, and admirably adapted to the work. They are fed by one steam pipe from two boilers, each 26ft x 6ft 6in, securely built in with bluestone masonry. The pumping and winding gear is of first-class quality, both as regards design and workmanship, and contracted for by Messrs Martin and Co , of the Black Hill Foundry, Scarsdale. The pumps are 12 in. 1n diameter, and can work to a stroke of 6 ft 8 in. if necessary. Altogether the machinery is most complete, and capable of working on an extensive scale

It was an interesting time and Glaud was fully involved.
Glaud Pender b

Somehow I don’t think Glaud would have had a guitar to accompany him singing The Rose of Allandale but this next version is lovely

For more stories with industrial connections go to the list on SEPIA SATURDAY

Cricket down The Bay

It is interesting how various kinds of Sports Clubs were formed in the small country towns around Australia.  Apollo Bay on the south west coast of Victoria  was no exception and the men of the Telford family were participants, both on and off the field.

The newspaper at the larger regional town of Colac reported news from all the surrounding small towns and so we know that at various times the Telford brothers George  , Robert , William,  Norman and either Abner Albert  or Arthur Alfred  all appeared as members  of the Apollo Bay cricket team before the First World War.  Only  initials, not Christian names,  were used in the reporting, hence the confusion with the “A”.

Cricket Team  at Apollo BayI think this  photo of the Apollo Bay cricket team could have been taken between 1900 and 1910.   Which of the Telford brothers were playing that day ?

Here are four of the Telford men.  Time to play pin the tail on the donkey or match the faces. I come up with a different solution every time I look at it but there are definitely some Telford faces in the cricket team. I wish you luck.  Missing are photos of the two oldest, George b1869 and Robert b 1872. It’s interesting to see how the men tended to wear their hats pushed back on their heads.  And some of them playing cricket in a collar and tie.

ss dorset

S.S. Dorset

Matches were played against other communities.  Some of these were inland but contests with Lorne involved a boat trip around the coast.  Often the Rifle Club had a contest on the same day.  The Albert Park cricket team came down from Melbourne for a match on Christmas Day 1901.  Away from home on Christmas Day ?  That sounds a bit strange.  They came down on the SS Dorset, which involves a trip down Port Philip Bay then through the Heads and out into the open ocean.

And then there was the local  Athletics Club.  In the 1908 AA Telford  (which AA? – Abner at 34 or Arthur at 25)  travelled to Stawell to compete in a larger annual Athletics Championships – who doesn’t know the Stawell Gift – and was placed 2nd in one of the heats of the 130 yd Hurdle Race.

Julia Telford Aged 17

Julia Telford Aged 17

But the ladies are not completely forgotten and their clothes  are always of interest.   At the Ball which followed the Annual Sports Day at Apollo Bay in 1898 it was reported that my 11 year grandmother Julia, niece of all these Telford sportsmen,  wore fawn, with trimmings while her slightly older sister wore shot lustre and her mother  black with jet trimmings.   I’m sure there must have been a pecking order in that newspaper list of guests at the Ball. They definitely weren’t in alphabetical order and the list, as always, was supplied by a local correspondent.

 Future  CricketersMore sporting memories are to be found in

this week’s Sepia Saturday

People sometimes comment that I seem to have a large collection of old family photos.  I should point out that I don’t own the original of all of them.  But I have collected copies of photos from family members for a long while.  At first someone photographed them for me, then the scanners came along.  My first scanner was a small hand held roller which you had to roll steadily over a snapshot.  Then came the better quality scanners.  Many of the owners of the photos didn’t want it known who had these family treasures.  I am very grateful to those people who let me copy their photos and in some cases actually gave me the original as at the time it was of an unknown person.  So what you see are  my family scans of which I own  quite a few of the originals but not all. Some of the original group photos  have already been donated to the State Library to make sure they will always be shared.b  They are online for all to see.

 

 

A baby in Adelaide in 1869

My contribution to Sepia Saturday this week, with its request for mother and baby photos is this carte de visite presenting  John Henry Baynham Bosley  born in Adelaide 6th June 1869 and sitting on the knee of his mother Corah.

ManWoman3chnAdelaideThis photographer changed the information on the back of his cards from time to time and this allows us to date this photo to  1869 – 1870.

BackOfManWoman3chnAlso in the photo is Thomas George Dufty Bosley. born October 1867,  sitting on his father’s knee, with Eliza Bosley born 1864 standing between her parents. There had been another daughter Annie but she had died. These children are my grandfather’s cousins.

The father in the photo is Thomas Bosley who came from Coleford in Gloucestershire and he was the older brother of my great grandmother Eliza Fricke We have seen her before in Tea Time with Bikes , at home in Newland St Coleford and as the mother of the bride in  the Bride was Eliza.

But we have also met  the toddler Thomas George on the right of the photo when he was older  in Men in Aprons – Potters   When this Tom Jr. was nine years old he began work at Hindmarsh Pottery  as an apprentice  to his Uncle George, now his stepfather.   His job was to weigh up the clay and prepare the balls for “throwing”.

Thomas and Corah had six children before Thomas died in 1873, three months before his sixth child was born.  Corah who was still in her twenties  then married Thomas’s younger brother George and had six more children.

This photo was in the possession of Eliza Fricke (nee Bosley), when she died.  She lived in Carisbrook, Victoria and her two brothers in Adelaide, South Australia.  Eliza Fricke’s two Bosley brothers are the only Adelaide connection discovered in the family ,  No one has said that this is a photo of Thomas and Corah Bosley and their children but my identification is based upon the  fact of Eliza Fricke’s two brothers living in Adelaide , the dating of the photo from recorded identifications used on the back of the carte de visite, and the order and ages of the children.

Another carte de visite from Adelaide dated at 1874 – 5 is this photo which I believe is the younger brother George, the second husband to Corah. He was a prominent potter in Adelaide at that time.

T.Duryea   Artist   Photographer No 57872 Carte de visite believed to 1874-5

I am quite confident with my deductions;  Until someone proves me wrong.

More Mums and Bubs and other bits and pieces are to found on this week’s Sepia Saturday.