Barwon Edge - 3 pools

From Eating In to Eating Out

2015.07A-26The idea of eating out at a cafe didn’t exist when i was growing up.  We ate at home, or sometimes had Sunday night tea at a friend’s house. Only on the occasional  visit to Melbourne would there be a modest meal in a cafe.   The Wattle Cafe springs to mind.

As a teenager I would be allowed a rare milk shake in a Milk Bar – but not a Malted milk, I didn’t like them.  And the height of luxury was a Banana Split for 9d (nine pence).  A potential luxury was the fish and chips shop but my mother didn’t trust the freshness of the fish as it had to be brought up from Melbourne.  The chips were another matter.  I adored them;  those lovely, dirty, tasty chips cooked in  fat which had  acquired a flavour all of its own.  I used to call them dirty chips as the chips my mother made were  so pale and golden and evenly toned, these days a food photographer’s delight.  But like the other treats dirty chips were a rarity.  (Note to self – when did refrigerated trucks come into being for the transport of fressh food ?}

And so I don’t have any early cafe pictures.

But now it is a different story.  Eating out is common but so is a visit to a cafe simply for a coffee.  Sometimes it is in the company of a friend but often in the company of a book.

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Barwon Edge is built on the river flats of the Barwon River at Geelong.  It used to be a Turf Farm but a few years ago the drought forced the transfer of the Turf Farm to another district.  We lost a Turf Farm but we gained a most attractive restaurant/cafe on the bank above the river, level with the tree tops.
 
 

 

Barwon EdgeBarwon Edge - river
 

 

 

 

 

It provides a coffee break for people using the walking path along the river. It is also a popular place for friends to meet for lunch.   On the other side, away from the river, remains a large grassed area and at the front door three pools provide a place  for displays of feeding the fish.  A pleasant interlude between two suburbs.

 

Barwon Edge - lunchbarwon-edge-1

 

 

 

 

 

But if it’s just coffee and a book there’s no need for a cafe – just a takeaway coffee in the car down at the Balliang Sanctuary a hop, step and a jump along the river from Barwon Edge.  Lots of lovely water birds to watch.

Or why bother with a cafe when you can have it all at home – food, coffee, book, cryptic crossword , radio, TV program,  remote control, everything  but the kitchen sink at your fingertips.

Dinner 2balliang3

 

 

 

 
 

 

And for more Cafe related stories go to this week’s Sepia Saturday

Two Coppers and an Ape Knee

1921     George V was on the throne of England,   Billy Hughes was Prime Minister of Australia, Harry Lawson (from Castlemaine)  was Premier of Victoria and Charlie Chaplin starred in “The Kid”.  Ginger Meggs made his first appearance in a comic strip, Australia beat England 5-0 at cricket (howzat ?} and Tom Tansey used three coins – – two pennies and one halfpenny — as a fob  to weight the end of his watch chain, with the help of a black grosgrain ribbon.Fob Watch Halfpenny b Fob Watch Penny back bSince the  Crimes (Currency) Act 1981 (Australia) it has been a criminal offence to deface or destroy current Australian currency coins but in the past it was quite common to punch a hole in coins and use them as a fob.     Fob Watch 1 bAnd do I have a photo showing Tom wearing his watch ?  Unfortunately no.  There are plenty  of photos of Tom in band uniform and but very few family photos of him.  And so it is hard to work out exactly how Tom wore his pocket watch.  The map and two shields on the black grosgrain ribbon seem to suggest that this ribbon may have been worn horizontally with a chain and watch attached  He may have kept his pocket watch in his trouser pocket or his waistcoat pocket.  He may have attached the chain through a buttonhole.  He may have ……I will probably never know.

Tom&Amelia 1940s Sydney

Tom In Sydney in the 1940s but no sign of a watch chain,

Fob Watch Three coins b

And so — two pence and a halfpenny

–                        tuppence and a ha’penny

–                                two coppers and a ha’penny

–                                         two coppers and an ape knee

More Money, Money, Money stories to be found in this week’s

Sepia Saturday

The Mobile Butcher

Sepia Saturday Header

A butcher’s shop from Sepia Saturday to inspire us this week.  Or perhaps, pigs, or shops, or white aprons, or whatever rises to the surface on viewing this image.

So I will return to an image I have used before, that of Robert Butler, farmer and butcher of Moolort then Newstead  in Central Victoria, and his mobile butcher’s cart.    He married my great aunt Eliza Fricke in 1901

PICT0152But I had never stopped to consider what the inside of the cart might have looked like until recently I saw this image of a butcher’s cart which served a similar purpose.

This is a 1920s photo of butcher Bert Fahey, with  the cart belonging  to a Mr Rettke, possibly in the Camperdown, Murchison or Shepparton districts and was posted in Lost Country Victoria by Bert’s son.  The butcher is about to sharpen his knife on a sharpening steel and has some spring scales hanging from the roof of the cart ready to weight the meat.

I have a feeling that I might turn vegetarian if I had to buy my meat in this fashion.

But I am having trouble concentrating on all things related to butchers at the moment as it seems to be that time of year when Ant School from somewhere around my place is in Work Experience week.  In summer you come to expect the occasional trail of well-organized mature little fellows going Hup, two,  three, four, Hup, two, three, four making a beeline for the kitchen.  But in Work Experience Week it is just these little groups of untested baby ants being sent out on reconnaissance missions to see how they go.  They soon come to a very unfortunate end but no-one comes looking for them,  they have failed, they are expendable. And when they don’t return another little group ventures out along a slightly different route, only to meet with the same fate.  Poor little ants.

More butchers, pigs, shops etc, but probably no ants, will be found in this week’s Sepia Saturday post.

 

Blouses with Ties; Black Stockings and Short Pants

This week I have a fairly good match to Sepia Saturday’s  theme photo with a photo of  the prefects at Colac High School in 1920

Colac is 150 km to the south west of Melbourne in Victoria.  There were 61 students when the  school opened in 1911 and it  was known as the Colac Agricultural High School.  As Colac was the centre of a farming area for some years the Pastoral and Agricultural Society had been agitating for such a school.

Colac High School 1920Seated at the left end in this 1920 photo is Charles Fricke, who at fifteen  was still to graduate into long pants. He didn’t live in Colac but came up each term from the coastal town of Apollo Bay and boarded privately. He would ride a horse up at the start of term then the horse would go into agistment until the end of term.   Smaller country towns couldn’t justify the need for a secondary school so the primary schools went to  Eighth Grade, after which students at fourteen were able to leave school and go home to work on the farm or take other employment.  Those who wanted more education went to a larger  town with a secondary school , or to a much larger town which had boarding schools.

Two years after Charles was photographed his younger sister Enid (on the right) was also attending the school.  Both went on to be teachers. They were then followed by another brother and two sisters.

But the original school was closed and since 2008 they do their learning in a  flat-roofed, uninteresting building, a derelict of the future.  1’m sure though that inside this bleak exterior some wonderful education is going on. I just can’t help loving older style  buildings.

The old school became  derelict. The creeper went from the pillars, the weeds grew, the building was vandalized.

colac high School 2014Let’s hope they can find some use for the old lady.

Colac High School 2015

More group photos can be found in the list on this week’s Sepia Saturday.

A Hotel in Castlemaine

I wouldn’t like to count the number of times I have walked around this corner  But that was many years after this photo was taken in 1906 at the corner of Barker and Templeton Streets in my home town of Castlemaine  in Central victoria.

Sepia Saturday tempted us this week with a photo of an imposing but austere hotel. I am much fonder of Australian buildings with their verandahs to protect us from the sun or to provide a place to sit and catch the evening breeze in the hot weather.

Castlemaine Council Club Hotel bThis well worn postcard  has 1906 handwritten on the back, but no message.  The hotel was originally built in 1875 as a single storey building  but in 1906 was converted to a fine two storey building. The next image shows the re-opening in 1906.

Castlemaine council club p-aitken-openingThis image came from  The Hub at 233 Barker St Castlemaine which is the present name of the building. They have a fine collection of photos of the Hotel over the years. De-licenced in 1970 in its present life The Hub is home to fifteen offices and one restaurant.

This is how Google Earth saw it in 2010 when it was undergoing its most recent renovation.

Castlemaine Council Club corner 2010 google earthBut my imagination takes me down the hill in the 1940s past, among others in the first block , the lawyers where for a while I thought that might be a good thing to do on leaving school, the bike shop where once stood a bike which was  labelled with my name as it waited for my birthday, the hairdresser – first perm, the shop where I spent my first ever earnings on a Toby jug for my mother,  the shop where I bought a hat with money i had earned myself,  the cafe where I washed dishes one school holidays, the newspaper shop where the morning paper cost tuppence,  the excellent photographer and the dreaded dentist.

As I said, I knew that corner well though I was never to go into the hotel.

More interesting hotels and big buildings can be seen through the links in

This Week’s Sepia Saturday

The Best of Intentions

I really try to respond to Sepia Saturday’s suggestions for  posts each week.  I really do.  But sometimes it just doesn’t work out.

Chess bTake three weeks ago for example. Chess.   The day this suggestion was posted I walked into our local librrary to pick up a book I’d ordered and right in front of me was a chess board, albeit a rather limp one. Out came the phone and snap, snap, there was a photo which perhaps I could include in a post.

I planned how I could include how my husband made a marble topped chess table – all the meticulous cutting of grey/black and white marble into small blocks and reassembling them, followed by the slow polishing to make a smooth surface and lowering into the lovely dark polished table.  A few shots of the chess set and the books and hey presto a post.  But it never happened.

The next week – a tunnel.  Well, this was the nearest I could come to a tunnel.

Cave at Queenscliff 1950 Norma Barbara DoreenIn 1950 Bendigo Teachers’ College sent its students to Queenslcliff for a one week Physical Education camp.  Plenty of spare time to explore the surrounds.  Does this look like a Tunnel.  Perhaps not.  More like a cave, or is it just an indentation in the cliff.  Is that Poldark’s Aidan Turner I see lurking in the shadows, storing contraband in the cave?  My mistake, this is not Cornwall, it is Australia.  Actually my friends say he is eye candy.  I fail to see it myself.  Oh dear.  Nothing got done.

desk 1963And this week the suggestion is a typewriter.  When I think of the procession of typewriters, word processors  and computers whose keyboards I have pounded you would think there would be a photo somewhere but no such luck.  But a typewriter usually sits on a desk and this 1963  photo shows a small portion of one of the desks we have had.  And no, she never took up smoking.

And coming up for the next three weeks we have hotels, fish and students.

As usual I have the best of intentions.

For others who have no trouble with their intentions consult Sepia Saturday 2015.05W-104

 

 

Kitchen Week – in Snitterfield

When Tom Tansey left Snitterfield near Stratford on Avon in 1888 to travel half way round the world to Geelong in Australia he knew that there was little chance that he would see his family again.  I find that hard to imagine, sixteen years old and never to see your parents, three sisters and brother. again.  Another sister was born the year after he left  but he was to meet her later on as she  also came to Australia.

Letitia Trickett, Geelong, aunt of Tom Tansey

Letitia Trickett, Geelong, aunt of Tom Tansey

 

One consolation was that he came to live with his Aunt Letitia  – his mother’s sister. She had married Phillip Trickett and settled in Geelong.  But she was a stranger to Tom as she had come to Australia in 1870, two years before Tom was born.

One thing Tom did have though was a photo of the kitchen that he left behind, the kitchen where he had grown up for sixteen years.

kitchen in SnitterfieldThe heart of the kitchen was a Victorian cast iron range- a utility version of the many kinds which were available.  There is a central firebox with a small oven either side and a chain hanging down to suspend a pot or kettle.  Either side of the range was a small warm nook, just the right size for a child.  There are interesting things to speculate on in the image – the lamp,  knickknacks on the mantlepiece, Father’s chair by the fire, bellows to blow the fire, a stool for a child  and what appears to be a curtain

There was a second brick oven outside in the  wash house.  It was there that the Sunday roast and Yorkshire pudding was cooked. The neighbours would bring their dinners to be baked and were charged a penny to help to help pay for the wood – they would also bake pies and tarts for the week.

This kitchen was the place for the weekly Saturday night bath in a tub in front of the fire.

It is where Tom’s mother sat to make rag rugs for the floor.

It is where Tom’s father would sit by the fire to read his Birmingham Weekly Post with a stumpy old clay pipe in his mouth (his nose warmer) and the cat Moses 0n his knee.

It is where Tom’s mother would set out for Gospel Oak to buy their honey and when there having to accept a cup of “tay” which had been strained through the seller’s hessian apron.

It was from this kitchen that Tom would set forth to band practice.

And from here he would also leave to go to school where he learnt his beautiful copperplate handwriting.

The details of life in the kitchen came from Ellen (Nin) Tansey (1889-1975), Tom’s sister who came to Australia as a war widow in 1920, to remarry and settle in Sydney.

More kitchen related stories can be found through this week’s Sepia Saturday bloggers.

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