Norm on Traction Engline

Tractors and Steamrollers

My late father-in-law  had a small farm just out of Kyneton for his spare time.  Mostly it was for sheep and cattle.  So he didn’t have a tractor but he did have what we called a traction engine but which others might call a steam roller.   It had previously been used in the construction of local roads.

I had my driving lessons in that car,

Not all the time was spent playing with the engine though.  Animals need attention.

Farmer NormBut then it was back to the traction engine.  What could be more useful for supplying the home with the unlimited  pile of wood needed for the wood stove, and the wood fires, and the wood copper, and for the fuel to run the steam engine which worked the steamroller.  No petrol needed.  This can be seen in this 1959 home movie clip for those who like fuzzy images of things moving up and down and round and round.

Other people’s engines can be found on this week’s Sepia Saturday

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Beethoven, Bach, Bartok, Brahms and Berlioz

Sepia Saturday this week is mainly about dogs and perhaps other pets. We were never a dog family.  Friends had dogs, but not us.

There was Lanham’s dog in the 1950s, which the children used to ride like a pony.

Or going back to about 1920 my mother’s friend, the Rawnsleys in Hay, had the  ugly pooch on the right.

Some people have both a cat and a dog as found on the internet in 2008 but uncredited.

How to tell of your dog's a loser

How to tell if your dog’s a loser

On the other hand  we were a cat family.  Even my great grandmother’s second cousins in the Borland family, included their cat in a family photo

Borland, R. W. family b

We had a cat most of the time, sometimes black and white but mostly tabby.

But the highlight came in 1975 when we had two Siamese cats.

Let me introduce you to Mumma Mitzi and her five kittens.   A good education for the children.

IMG_0150And what did I name the kittens – Beethoven, Bach, Berlioz, Brahms and Bartok.

There are five kittens in the box but one of them has her head tucked down.

Good homes were found for all of them.

Meanwhile it’s raining cats and dogs over at Sepia Saturday this week.

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#cats

Polka Music in Geelong

The railway line between Melbourne and Geelong opened in 1857 and in 1866 von Rochlitz published the Geelong – Melbourne Railway Polka, this copy from the National Library of Austtalia.   It was a common practice for a new song to be  commissioned for the band to play at the opening of a new railway.

Geelong-Melbourne Railway Polka

Over the years Polkas appear in the programs of musical entertainments in Geelong including performances by Geelong’s Volunteer Rifle Band, the oldest Victorian Militia unit, first raised in 1854 in Geelong as a Volunteer Rifle Corps

The Volunteers were present for the arrival of the first train and the official opening of the Geelong Railway Station  and so was a band who played some spirited items.   A huge banquet was arranged but unfortunately the train was late and the locals had their fill of the feast before the  invited guests arrived, including the Governor, Members of Parliament  and other dignitaries.

The Geelong Artillery Band , as the Volunteer Rifle Corps band later became,  is commemorated in the Bollard Walk along the seafront.  The band played its  first recital in 1861

bollard band

And what could they possibly be playing ?

Geelong Polka music  Flickr 3374324250_5290276276_z

My grandfather, Tom Tansey, joined this band some time after arriving in Australia in 1888  and was with them until 1899.  This photo of the Artillery band was taken in 1890

Artillery-1890And was Tom with the band when this photo was taken ?  I don’t know. His portrait (below) was in the uniform of the Geelong Town Band c1900.

Tom-ValveTrombone

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This is my contribution to Sepia Saturday for this week but there are plenty more examples of polkas, violets, music and mystery posts to be found in the links on the Sepia Saturday page.

 

A Pot Pourri of Parades

Different places, different times, different reasons. Parades occur in all forms and sizes, in towns large and small, in Australia.  My collection progresses in time through  a coastal village, a capital city  and a smaller regional city.

I have posted this photo before , from Apollo Bay on the south western coast of Victoria.  It is probably the Anzac Day procession in 1917.
ABProcessionStreet

Move in place and time to Adelaide, the capital city of South Australia.  Each year they have a Christmas Pageant.  These  photos from the late 1950s  were given to me by a friend as her husband played  in the band – the South Australian Railway Institute Band – when marching in the Parade.

South Australian Railway Institute Band 1

 

 

 

 

 

South Australian Railway Institute Band 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I like these photos because there was no need for barricades.

Then there is Bendigo  in Central Victoria  c 1967 and its marvellous annual Easter Parade

Here are my two little blondies  watching the parade and a pipe band passing by. Once again there are no barriers to keep the crowd back.  But the main attraction was always the splendid Chinese  dragon.

Bendigo Easter Parade c1966

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bendigo Easter Parade c1967 b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Bendigo came to be associated with a Chinese dragon is explained in this clip.

And to come right up to date, February 28th,  today Geelong had its annual Pako Fest parade , in Pakington St, celebrating culutral diversity.  Geelong Mayor’s Facebook page supplied this image.

Pako Fest

This is my collection of Parade photos.  Other examples of recollections of Parades past and present can be found at Sepia Saturday.

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Australian Television in 1962

Broadcasting is one of the possible themes for this week’s Sepia Saturday which set me thinking about the early days of television in Melbourne.  Television came to Melbourne in time for the 1956 Olympic Games.

This is a photo I took of our television set in 1962 when Victor Borge was very popular, developed and printed by yours truly.  It was taken on a Yashica twin lens reflex.  Do you remember Victor Borge, with his wonderful blend of piano playing and comedy.

Victor Borge Show TV sunshine 26-5-62 b

And this photo was taken the previous month of the same stand-alone black and white television,   when colour television and  remote controls were only dreamed of.18-5-1962For a nostalgic trip for Australian readers (well, some of them ) earlier in the same year saw the presentation of the 4th Annual TV Logie Awards.  I had to dig deep to remember some of these names.

Logies1962

And finally here is a short clip of the two delightful Gold-winning singers

See what other interesting ideas  people find in this image of broadcasting from the top of a bus at Sepia Saturday.

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And After Valentine’s Day …………

First comes Valentine’s Day, on February 14th, all sweetness and light …..

2015.01W-64 And then comes reality …..

Funny 1909This postcard, from Bamforth & Co, was posted in April 1909.

This at a time when women didn’t go out to work, women didn’t wear pants or jeans, and when a domineering woman who ruled her hen-pecked husband was said “to wear the trousers“.

Perhaps a modern version would have Who is going to have control of the remote control ?

More connections to Valentine’s Day can be seen through the links on Sepia Saturday.

Dockside with the Randwick District Town Band

This week Sepia Saturday  has given us an image of a harbour, with its docks busy with ships.  And so I go to a Sydney dockside, back in  the  1960s when the big liners were a way of travelling from country to country and not just for holiday cruises, ships like the Oronsay travelling  from Sydney to England in about 3 weeks.   It was also a time when brass bands would play dockside as the liner was leaving.  In this photo from the 1960s it is the Randwick District Town Band which had formed in 1961.  Hilda Tansey. now in her sixties, is near the lower right hand corner, long after she was Bandmaster of the Sydney Ladies Brass Band.  Each departure was a big occasion

Randwick Band 1960s

Today we  don’t see aeroplanes departing for overseas being farewelled in such style.

The following quote is taken out of its original context which dealt with more creative activities,   http://tinyurl.com/q2pp332

 `There’s something to be said for following those little voices in your head that say, “Do it.”

`Because if you don’t, that moment gets lost to history.

But I feel it applies equally well to my  posts in Sepia Saturday (and to yours too).   In time there is always a reader or two who has a definite connection to what i am writing. When I link photos, facts and occasionally speculations there is always the possibility that if I don’t some little thing will be lost to history for all time . I’m not referring to momentous events but to the changing way of life over the years..

This week I started converting a box of slides from the 1960s into .jpg format for the computer.  So when browsing today I was delighted to find that the Daily Mail online has an article on slides from the 1960s which have been recovered.

There you will find a delightful snapshot of Britain in the 1960s. Most of my slides seem a bit ordinary in comparison but some might be of interest in the future.  For example, does anyone at children’s birthday parties nowadays play games like these, as in 1961.

Which brings me  to what Sepia Saturday is all about, as they state on their blog.

Sepia Saturday provides bloggers with an opportunity to share their history through the medium of photographs. Historical photographs of any age or kind (they don’t have to be sepia) become the launchpad for explorations of family history, local history and social history in fact or fiction, poetry or prose, words or further images.

I like that expression launch pad.  It is exactly what  we do, begin with a photo and then launch ourselves off in varying directions   Fantastic.  Thank you Sepia Saturday.

More harbours, ports, docks, coastlines at this week’s Sepia Saturday.

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