Crowded Streets

A first reaction to the idea of crowded streets is “Cars”.   But there are many ways to crowd a street.

Stratford Memorial 1922February 12, 1922 and Bridge Street in Stratfod-on-Avon in Warwickshire was crowded with foot traffic for the unveiling of the War Memorial which listed the names of the local serving men who died in World War One.  Notice that the Memorial is standing in the middle of the street.  After it was hit by a lorry it was shifted to a safer location.

We met Mary Matilda Checkets in Framed in a Doorway in Snitterfield , By 1922 she was  the widow Mrs Tansey, had moved from Snitterfield and  was now  living in Stratford on Avon .  Her youngest daughter Ellen was also a widow.  She had been married to Private Amos Unitt but he had been killed at Pozieres in 1918  and Ellen had gone to Australia and re-married.

Mary Matiilda sent this postcard to her six year old  grandson in Australia.  His father Amos Latham Unitt had  been born in Stratford on Avon and so his name was entitled to be included on the War Memorial.

Stratford Memorial 1922 Back

I think there is a little bit more to this postcard.  It is stamped so has been sent to Mrs Tansey  without putting it in an envelope .  Then she has signed it as Gran and indicated that it was for her grandson Stan and it has ended up in Australia.   I think the two handwritings are different so who was it sent it to Mrs Tansey in the first place ?

Earlier than this, in 1907 on the other side of the world, Camp St in Beechworth was crowded  with four horse- drawn vehicles. Beechworth in north eastern Victoria is a remnant of the  gold rush in the 1850s  This postcard has a linen type texture which makes it hard to scan.  Bandmaster Tom Tansey and his wife were to live in this street in the 1930s.

Beechworth Postcard 1907Perhaps some day I will be able to find a family member connected to the recipient of this  Beechworth postcard and hand it over.

Beechworth Postcard 1900 BackA Parade is another way of crowding a street.  A Gala Day Parade is held each year in Geelong to raise money for the local hospital  Here is the Geelong West Brass Band marching down Moorabool Street in the Gala Day Parade in 1931.  The bandmaster was Eric Searle.  The band had been revived in 1929 after having lapsed a couple of times.

GWest-Gala-1931

Anyone who follows the road bike racing might be interested to know that this is the part of Moorabool Street which was the start and finish of the 2010 World Road Championships Time Trials. and was the finishing point for the Road Races,

And in a Parade in Sydney c1938 the members of the Sydney Ladies Brass Band were on a highly decorated float, led by their trainer and conductor Hilda Tansey.

Float1For more interesting early  street scenes go to the links in Sepia Saturday

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12 thoughts on “Crowded Streets

  1. Little Nell

    Nice old pictures, and the reverse of the postcards are just as interesting. Once again I’m amazed that those cards found their way with such a simple address; no postcode needed in those days!

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  2. Bob Scotney

    That first card will be an appropriate one to show to commemorate the WWI centenary later this year. My son-in-law’s father and mother lived in the Geelong area when they emigrated there from Poland/Germany after WWII before later moving to the USA.

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  3. linda l

    A nice puzzle re the post card.. just a thought.. the card was sent to Mrs Tansly by the war memorial committee or town hall, as she was the only NOK living in the area.. and she got it, decided her grandson should have and so wrote on it and forwarded it to him.

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  4. La Nightingail

    Ship Ahoy and the Ladies Brass Band is a great picture! What a wonderful imagination someone had. I wonder – was there a marine theme to the parade?

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  5. Mike Brubaker

    On the first card, I think the placement of the monument seems such a clear obstacle that the puzzle is “What were they thinking?” Of course the band photos are terrific. Australian bands don’t show up very often on the sale sites I frequent. Their uniform fashions have subtle differences from the bands of North America. I noticed the awnings over the pedestrian walkways. That seems very unique to the hot climate of Australia. Are they still a traditional urban design?

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